Days Gone

Above: A still image taken from a game-play demo of the upcoming video-game Days Gone. Credit: New Game Network.

Violence

It is both logical and obvious that the consequence of a large number of persons carrying out psychopathic acts in realistic video games will lead to an increase in real-world violence. As the American Psychological Association (APA) Resolution on Violent Video Games, 2015, states: "Scientific research has demonstrated an association between violent video game use and both increases in aggressive behavior, aggressive affect, aggressive cognitions, and decreases in prosocial behavior, empathy, and moral engagement. There is convergence of research findings across multiple methods and multiple samples with multiple types of measurements demonstrating the association between violent video game use and both increases in aggressive behavior, aggressive affect, aggressive cognitions and decreases in prosocial behavior, empathy, and moral engagement. All existing quantitative reviews of the violent video game literature have found a direct association between violent video game use and aggressive outcomes. This body of research, including laboratory experiments that examine effects over short time spans following experimental manipulations and observational longitudinal studies lasting more than 2 years, has demonstrated that these effects persist over at least some time spans. Research suggests that the relation between violent video game use and increased aggressive outcomes remains after considering other known risk factors associated with aggressive outcomes."

In the UK, violent crime is rising dramatically. (The most recent figures reveal a 22% increase in knife crime and 11% rise in gun crime.) Many are looking around for an explanation. One basic explanation is close at hand: the violent video-game. For some reason this does not want to be accepted or acted on. It is empirically proven and demonstrable that there is a link between carrying out virtual violence and carrying out real violence, however, this fact remains contested and for many it is supposedly not proven definitively. Could the explanation for this disconnect of logic be that those who continue to contest-and-question are in fact in favour of a more violent society (consciously or not) and (consciously or not) are seeking to cause violence to rise? That is certainly a basic Freudian interpretation of the current situation in which violent video-game use by children is not regulated.

(27 July 2018)